Charity

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QGI members work on charity quilts at a Quilt-In.

Monthly Charity Group at North United Methodist Church

NW corner of 38th and Meridian, Indianapolis

3rd Thursday monthly 9:30 – 3:00 P.M.

No meetings January, August, and December.

Each year the guild makes quilts to donate to local service organizations. Many members make tops that are turned into quilts at a monthly workday and then redistributed to members to tie. Anyone is welcome to make tops and/or participate at the monthly Third Thursday Workday (except for January, August, and December) held at North United Methodist Church in the Fellowship Hall from approximately 9:30-3:00. Bring sewing supplies and a sack lunch. Come for all day or any part of the day.

We accept any size top but sizes most needed are adult: 60×85, child 45×60, baby 45×45.

We hope you will mark your calendar now and plan to attend one or more of these gatherings.
Margaret Duke
Charity Quilts Chairman

 

Download Quilt Patterns for Charity Quilts

 

Quilt-Ins To Celebrate Quilt Day in March

March 18, 2017 has been designated as National Quilting Day
this year. In recognition of this special day two special quilt-in
observances have been scheduled for the guild.

On March 18th Dallas Reed has arranged for the first quilt-in to be held
at the Irvington United Methodist Church. The church is
located near the corner of Washington and Audubon.

Nancy Jo Clapp has made arrangements for the second quilt-in to be
March 25th at the St Augustine Home (Little Sisters of the
Poor) near the corner of Township Line and 86th Street.
Both of these meetings will be pitch-ins from 9 a.m. to 3 or 4
p.m. You can bring your sewing machine or just bring general
sewing tools. You will find that there will be numerous jobs
from which to choose.

What happens at a quilt-in day?
You can bring a sewing machine if you wish, you’ll be helping to piece backings and stitch around pinned quilt “sandwiches”
Or bring large scissors to help trim and turn the quilts after stitching
Or help lay out and pin the tops and backs with batting (great stretching workout)
Or bring large-eyed sharp needles (tapestry or crewel or darning) and small scissors to tie quilts

At each location, we’ll be starting up around 9:30 AM and finishing up by 3:00-4:00 PM. There will be a pitch-in lunch each day, so bring your favorite dish to share. You can plan to spend the whole day, or just a few hours, or come early to help set up, or stay late to help clean up.

The quilts we work on at these events will go to local organizations that serve families and children in need.

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Individual Charity Projects

  • Quilts for PreemiesThank you to all who have made these precious little gifts of love.  Preemie quilts are given to area hospitals to be used to cover babies or isolates, behind their backs for support or in other ways as the hospitals determine.  Our hope is that the family takes a quilt home with them at discharge.   Specifics: Any size between 30”x32” or smaller – dimensions of an isolate.  (Suggested sizes: Quilt Squares: 18″x18″, Blankets: 26″x36″ to 30″x36″, Incubator Cover: 5’x6′-cotton backing with no batting
    Cotton pieced front.  The smoother the better – no thick bumps or seams.  No batting. Please use FLANNEL back.  Light quilting but please do not tie.  Contact Sandy Haneline if you have any questions.  There will be someone at most meetings to accept your donations.
  • Piece a charity quilt top. At every meeting, you can pick up material for making a charity quilt. There are no rules here, as the need is great. To best fit the batting we have on hand, we ask that you piece tops in these rough sizes: baby quilts (45” x 45”), lap quilts for young children (45” x 60”), or larger tops for adults and teens (60” x 85”). The Guild has a vast supply of material for piecing so just ask! You can complete your quilt by using your own batting and your own/charity fabric for the back, although that is not required. After piecing a charity quilt top, bring it to any meeting for completion by the Third Thursday Charity Quilts group and later distribution by our Charity Quilts chairperson.
  • Quilt a charity quilt. If you cannot attend the once-monthly Charity Quilts group meeting, feel free to take a pillow-cased quilt home to tie or quilt yourself. This is a great opportunity to give back, whether you do it solo or with your bee. If you are a new long-arm quilter, this is a wonderful way to help people in your community while building your quilting skills. You can long-arm quilt a pillow-cased top if you like, but if you choose to quilt a pieced top and add a backing (using your own fabric or the charity fabric that’s readily available), we only ask that you also bind the quilt as well so that it is finished since our process does not involve binding a quilt. Bring the completed quilt to a meeting for collection and later distribution by our Charity Quilts chairperson.
  • Dress an Angel. Unfortunately, not all of the premature babies in our area hospitals survive. To help the families of these little ones deal with their loss, the Guild provides small gowns and bonnets to families of preemies for use as funeral garments or keepsakes for the parents who select cremation. Patterns for the gown and bonnet are available at Guild meetings. Return the completed bonnet and gown to a meeting for collection and distribution by our Preemie Quilt chairperson.
  • Quilts of Valor. Quilts of Valor are quilts made to honor those touched by war and have wounds that can and cannot be seen. Quilts are preferred to be at least 60″ x 80″ and no bigger than 72″ x 90″. These quilts are often red, white, blue and gold. If you would like to honor past and or present military members, bring your completed quilt to a Guild meeting for distribution. Our group is coordinated by Kathryn Wooldridge and Christine Hurley, Guild members who have taken on this. worthy cause. Please visit online at: www.qovf.org for more info.
  • Hats for the Homeless. Many of our members enjoy a vast array of hand-crafts, including knitting and crocheting. If you enjoy these arts as well, why not make a knitted or crocheted cap for distribution to the homeless during the winter months? Yarn and patterns are available at Guild meetings; bring your completed hats to a meeting for collection and distribution by Nancy Jo Clapp and Pat Crossland, Guild members who have taken on this worthy cause.

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    Quilts of Valor presentation to a Korean War veteran

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